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Huron River fishing and foam warnings remain in effect for a third year

Fishermen are urged not to eat fish from the Huron River and everyone should avoid any foam on the waterway. (Photo: WI DNR)
Fishermen are urged not to eat fish from the Huron River and everyone should avoid any foam on the waterway. (Photo: WI DNR)(NBC15)
Published: Jul. 2, 2020 at 2:53 PM EDT
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LANSING, Mich. (WJRT) - Fishermen have been advised to avoid eating fish from the Huron River and other waterways in four counties where PFAS have been found.

The “Do Not Eat” and “Avoid Foam” advisories from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services were issued in 2018 and remain in effect this summer.

“Both advisories remain in effect until scientific evidence indicates that advisories are no longer necessary,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, who is Michigan’s chied medical executive.

State researchers found high levels of PFOS and PFAS in fish filets taken from Kent Lake, Base Line Lake and Argo Pont in 2018. High levels of PFOS also were found in the river from Norton Creek to Barton Pond.

The “Do Not Eat” advisory covers the Huron River from the point where Wixom Road crosses into Oakland County, through Livingston, Washtenaw and Wayne counties all the way to Lake Erie.

Other waterways included in the advisory are:

  • Norton Creek, Hubbell Pond or Mill Pond and Kent Lake in Oakland County.
  • Ore Lake, Strawberry and Zukey Lake, Gallagher Lake, Loon Lake, Whitewood lakes, Base Line Lake and Portage Lake in Livingston County.
  • Barton Pond, Geddes Pond, Argo Pond and Ford Lake in Washtenaw County.
  • Belleville Lake and Flat Rock Impoundment in Wayne County.

Everyone on the Huron River also is advised to avoid swallowing foam and wash it off skin as soon as possible because it likely is caused by high levels of PFAS. Pet owners also should not allow animals to get near any foam.

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy is continuing to study elevated PFAS levels on the Huron River.

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