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Former Flint mayor overjoyed by talk of criminal charges for Gov. Snyder in water crisis

“Get over it, get over it. Go to prison and get over it,” Weaver said.
Flint, Mich. Mayor Karen Weaver testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 10,...
Flint, Mich. Mayor Karen Weaver testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, before a House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee hearing on the Flint water crisis . (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (WNDU)
Published: Jan. 12, 2021 at 7:35 PM EST
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FLINT, Mich. (WJRT) - Former Flint Mayor Karen Weaver is quite happy with Tuesday’s reports that former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder will face criminal charges from the Flint water crisis.

The Associated Press is reporting that Snyder and several of his top aides will face criminal charges for their alleged roles in causing the water crisis. ABC12 has learned that an announcement of charges is scheduled for Thursday.

Weaver said she’s still processing the news and awaiting more details on what charges Snyder will face.

Weaver became mayor in 2015 and was the city’s first elected leader following a string of state-appointed emergency managers. It was a critical time for Flint just one year after the city’s water source was changed to the Flint River, which caused the water crisis.

For years, Weaver said she fought for justice to ensure people were held accountable for poisoning the city. On Tuesday, she he one thing to say to Snyder stemming from a conversation they had years ago while both were in office.

”Get over it, get over it. Go to prison and get over it,” Weaver said. “Because when I went to talk to him and to fight for Flint and to get things, he told me to get over it -- you need to get over it. So, that’s what he can do is eat his words. How about that?”

Current Flint Mayor Sheldon Neeley said the possibility of new criminal charges against Snyder, his top aides and other leaders in his administration are a step toward finding justice for the community.

“Our community has been through a tragedy it never should have faced, but Flint is strong and we will continue moving forward,” he said.

Neeley said the water service line replacement project across Flint is nearly complete with fewer than 500 homes to check. Since 2016, city contractors have investigated the water lines at more than 27,000 homes and replaced more than 9,900 that were made of lead or galvanized metal.

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