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White House increases Michigan’s COVID-19 vaccine allocation amid rising statistics

Michigan has the second highest per capita increase in newly confirmed cases
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer holds a press conference on COVID-19 in Michigan.
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer holds a press conference on COVID-19 in Michigan.(source: State of Michigan)
Published: Mar. 30, 2021 at 5:45 PM EDT
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LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan will be receiving a significant increase in COVID-19 vaccine shipments beginning next week, as the state deals with increases in key statistics for the illness.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer asked the White House for a vaccine increase during a call with other governors on Tuesday and President Joe Biden’s administration responded with a promise to send more than 66,000 more doses.

Michigan is slated to receive a total of 620,040 doses of COVID-19 vaccine next week, which includes 147,800 doses of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine. That would nearly double the number of Johnson & Johnson doses the state has received thus far.

“I’m so grateful to have a partner in the White House that has our backs here in Michigan,” Whitmer said. “We know that the COVID-19 vaccine is highly effective at preventing COVID-19. These additional doses of the safe, effective vaccines will help us slow the spread of the virus, return to normalcy, and continue building our economy back better.”

Whitmer was among seven governors who participated in the call hosted by the White House and the National Governors Association.

Michigan had the country’s second-highest per-capita case rate over the past week, trailing only New York. The number of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and the percentage of positive tests all reached highs for the month of March in the past week.

“As we work closely with our state’s leading health experts to monitor COVID-19 trends, I’m asking Michiganders to double down on smart precautions,” Whitmer said. “The pandemic is not yet behind us, but we’ve learned a tremendous amount about how to protect ourselves and our loved ones.”

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